Posts Tagged Yelp

Text Message marketing Vs Email Marketing | RealtyGo | MobileURL’s | QR Codes | GPS | zuzu

Text Message marketing Vs Email Marketing | RealtyGo | zuzurealestate | MobileURL’s | QR Codes | GPS

iPad - RealtyGo - Mobile Real Estate listings

 

RealtyGo offers end users 4 modalities for current and immediate real estate listing information; QR Code, GPS, Call, SMS/MMS mobile gateway technology.

Mobile Real Estate Listings

The Mobile URL in the image  is the word “DEMO”

In many ways text message marketing and email marketing are very similar. With multiple forms of marketing available you should offer them all and let the consumer decide which avenue they are comfortable using. Overall you are asking your customers to give you their contact information so you may update and market to them directly.

Building an email phone and text message marketing list of your best customers is a way not to waste money on advertising by casting a wide net and hoping your customers see it. RealtyGo analytics enable you to form a current and relevant  list, you can use efficiently to market to those customers who want to receive offers from you, have already spent money with you or requested information and in most cases are most likely to respond positively to your offers.

There are quite a few vast differences that effect the redemption rates, ability to bring instant sales, and ‘read’ rates in any type of consumer ‘opt in’ marketing.

Fewer than 20% of email messages are opened. Within 15 minutes of sending a text blast, over 95% of your subscribers will have read the message. Think to yourself, every time your mobile phone beeps, how long does it take you to read the text message?

With RealtyGo’s automated software, any time you make a change to your listing(s) a auto message is sent to ‘end users’ that have requested information about your listing(s), for example; if you change the price of a listing or the seller decides to offer their listing for lease and for sale. These are important things a potential buyer or interested party need to know. RealtyGo automatically updates previous consumers that solicited  listing information, any time you make a change, by sending a friendly text message alert.

Customers contact information is automatically captured and displayed in your login area under the specific MobileURL and real estate listing the QR Code and SMS text messages are affiliated with. The mobile call to action is easily integrated into print, radio, television, in store signage and online applications such as Twitter, Facebook, Yelp, Google Local Search. They simply text your MobileURL or Scan the QR Code and all your professional business real estate information is provided. With email signups customers have to be on your website and enter their email address or fill out a form in your business.  With consumer trends rapidly moving toward the mobile communication channel for faster and more efficient communication using text messaging and QR codes; You need to give the consumer what they want when they want it and with the tool they use most frequently and feel most comfortable with, Their mobile device(s). By offering multiple contact modalities like Text messaging, GPS and QR Codes you enable consumers an easier and faster way to get the immediate information they want, most importantly the way the consumer wants to get it. More options or ways a consumer can contact you  enables you to build your marketing list much faster, and consumers will continue to utilize your services, due to the fact they know they will receive current and relevant information pertaining to their original interests in your real estate business.

Text Message Marketing Vs Email Marketing.

With text message marketing, you have the ability to increase sales the same day your message is sent. Often new sales can be in your door in under an hour or even market to customers already in your business. New text messages are read in an average of 14 minutes while the average time for someone to read an email is 6.4 hours. In addition, unless your customers have web-enabled phones, which only 14% do, they will have to wait until they are in front of a computer to read it, then print out the offer to bring it in to redeem it. With text marketing, the customer just has to show the text to the business to redeem. These same principals apply with information. Consumers can access immediate information about your real estate listing(s) and Auto Schedule an appointment to meet with the listing Agent or owner based on the listers pre set schedule. The Auto Scheduler allows Agents/Brokers to use their time more efficiently, social networking, continuing education, create new marketing campaigns and meeting with potential buyer.

Typically the benefit of email vs text messaging is cost. There are email marketing providers for small businesses that charge $20 a month. This is for unlimited email blasts. The redemption rates are often low, only averaging 5%, and only offering one modality for consumer contact.

RealtyGo offers all 4 current modalities for contact and much more, for half that price and at a 90% better ROI return-on-investment.

Get more, do less – RealtyGo

via zuzurealestate | Just another WordPress.com site. RealtyGo blog

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every social service is an island… ; Great Article, we had to Repost!

Google has unveiled the awkwardly-named Hotpot, which is a kind of ratings tool and recommendation engine for Google Places.

As you review restaurants, music venues, stores and the like, Hotpot’s recommendation engine learns what you like and suggests other places you might like. Throw in recommendations from friends and Hotpot starts to sound very useful. Indeed Hotpot is useful, bringing location-based searching, algorithms that learn what you like and friends’ recommendations together in a single place.

But, perhaps because of that combination of features, it’s also awkward to set up and poorly integrated with the rest of Google’s services. It has some features that trump its main competitor, Yelp, like the awesome search tool. But the social and community aspects of Hotpot — features Yelp handles well — are too difficult to get set up.

Which isn’t to say that Hotpot isn’t useful. You just have to clear its awkward silo-style hurdles first. If you head over to the new Hotpot URL, you’ll be asked to sign in with your Google account and then to pick a nickname for use on Google Places.

Once that’s done you’ll need to find your friends and “add” then to your list of Hotpot friends. Setting up Hotpot feels a bit like you just slipped back in time five years to a web where every social service is an island.

It could be that Google was worried about another Buzz-style backlash if it made Hotpot’s social features automated. Instead, everything is manual — you’re presented with a list of friends that you can add (follow might be the more familiar verb here) much like the process Google Reader uses.

However, with Reader the sharing notices are sent inside the Reader web app. With Hotpot, the notices are sent to your friend’s Gmail account for approval. Worse, there doesn’t seem to be an “Add all” button — if you’ve got 300 friends, you’ll be click “Add” 300 times.

Once you’ve made it past the initial hurdles of setting Hotpot up, its results are actually pretty good. Having only tested Hotpot for a few hours, it’s hard to judge the quality of recommendations, but as a simple Google Places search tool, the interface is clean and easy to use.

Hotpot is also integrated into normal Google searches as well. Just click the Places option in the list of filters and you see reviews and ratings from your friends alongside the familiar Yelp, Urbanspoon and other aggregated ratings.

The aggregated reviews are a win for Hotpot. The big difference between Yelp and Google Hotpot is volume — Yelp has hundreds of reviews for all the restaurants in my neighborhood written by individuals from its loyal users. Google has a big enough database of user reviews, but it’s not as vibrant or extensive as Yelp’s.

But Hotpot gets around that limitation by culling reviews from around the web — in the case of restaurants, there’s Zagat, OpenTable, Gayot, Yelp, Blogspot and WordPress food blogs. Some places have a lot of Google user reviews, but Yelp usually always has more.

Though there needs to be a way to keep reviews from Insider Pages from showing up in Hotpot. They are universally worthless and presumably written mainly by YouTube commenters.

It’s interesting to note that Yelp is all about community, and Hotpot’s mapping and searching features are more advanced, but its community and social features are lacking. The two would be a perfect match if they were combined. Yelp reportedly screwed up a chance to be bought by Google last year — consider it salt on the wound that Google is pulling reviews from Yelp to beef up its own competing product.

Where Hotpot may find its big mojo, which would save it from the same fate as Google Wave, is inside Google’s mobile apps. For now that means Android 1.6+, though an iPhone app is in the works. There’s no word on a Windows Mobile app.

The new features in the Google Android app mean that, if you’re in an unfamiliar part of town, you can quickly find a nearby restaurant that your friends love, or an out-of-the-way music store you didn’t know about.

Link: http://www.webmonkey.com/2010/11/google-hotpot-smartens-up-local-search-but-its-no-yelp-killer/

RealtyGo.co launches its answer to “Hot Spots” mid February of 2011

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